Saturday, March 17, 2012

Cloetta Pops Crunchy

Polenta cake with ragout

Food Diary (March 17, 2012)
Breakfast: Rolled oats with kiwifruit, sunflower seeds and flax seeds
Lunch: Polenta cake with ragout
Dinner: Black bean and vegetables with pasta
Baking/sweets: Polenta/Semolina Crackers , chocolates

I recently received Cloetta Pops Crunchy to sample. The sampling was arranged by Smartson. The packet says “chocolate covered pops with a salty twist”. Crispy, crunchy corn puffs with lightly salted yogurt based filling is coated with chocolate. The sweet salty combination works very well. Unfortunately I didn’t get much of the yogurt flavor, a stronger yogurt flavor would have been excellent. Overall, very delicious addictive little morsels. I found it impossible to stop until I finished the bag. Thankfully it was 110 grams only otherwise I could have been in big trouble.


Today's Favourite Photo
Poppy Seed Cherry Muffins with Eggnog



Today’s Favourite Blog
A list of 6 scary things hiding in your food. The list has been complied for food items sold in the US, it may not be true for other countries. It could be better or worse.

TBHQ, a.k.a Butane
Butane is not just for lighters. It is put in chicken nuggets to keep them “fresh” tasting. Butane can also be found in frozen, packaged or pre-made processed foods with long shelf lives such as frozen meals, crackers, chips, cereal bars and fast food.

Estrogen
Regular milk is full of hormones used by the milk industry

Spinach dust
Spinach dust is the green sheen on veggie snacks. It’s just powdered spinach dust, which is spinach that has been dehydrated and sucked dry of its nutritional value. Green sheen is about as nutritious as actual dust. It is found in “healthier” vegetable flavored snack foods.

Propylene glycol, a.k.a antifreeze
Antifreeze keeps fat free cookie dough ice cream creamy, smooth and juicy. It is found in cake mix, salad dressings, low fat ice creams and dog food.

Wood Pulp: Vanillin
Vanillin, which is a byproduct of the pulp industry, is used as an artificial vanilla flavor. Ester of wood rosin, which comes from pine stumps, is in citrus-flavored sodas to keep the citrus flavor evenly distributed through the can. It is also found in artificially flavored yogurt, baked goods, candy and sodas

Castoreum
Castoreum comes out of a beaver’s behind – it’s extracted from their anal glands — and is used to make artificial raspberry flavoring. It is found in artificially raspberry flavored products such as cheap ice cream, Jell-O, candy, fruit flavored drinks, teas and yogurts.


The last one makes me think how scientists manage to find such flavours in all sorts of places. 

14 comments:

  1. Polenta is one food I'd like to experiment with more. Your ragout looks delicious on top of the cakes.

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  2. Really scary things in our food!

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  3. EEEEEWwwwwwww!!!! That last item is GROSS!! That's it! No more raspberry flavored stuff .. I'm throwing out my Jellos! Now I know why the expression "blowing a raspberry". Eck.
    ... almost made me forget to tell you the polenta cakes are lovely!
    And better not ask for a stronger yogurt flavor. Who knows what is needed to make it taste like so :)

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    1. I am sure its hygienic, and its all natural, if that makes you feel any better:) Maybe not the best option for vegetarians!

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  4. Castoreum sounds less than desirable! I remember when I first heard where cochineal came from I wasn't too impressed but this is much less appealing!

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    1. It is less then desirable for sure. Real raspberries are probably more appealing!

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  5. It sounds like a double polenta day ;-) I love your presentation of the ragout with neat beautiful polenta slices.
    Ok, so I will never eat anything raspberry flavoured!
    One thing I know is my milk doesn't contain estrogen: I have been buying only organic milk for years (it also doesn't contain antibiotics, my first reason to stop buying standard milk which is full of them). Actually I use rather soy milk and cow's milk rarely, but both organic.
    After having seen a scary documentary about what happens in European world of food industry, I'm sure it looks similar here... maybe different products, but probably equally scary.

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    1. Thank you, I ate lot of polenta yesterday, but no raspberry flavoured stuff:)
      In case you have been enjoying the occasional raspberry flavoured stuff, I guess you could ignore the fact and eat again. Or maybe it will be difficult now?
      I rarely use standard milk so I guess once in a while is OK. Not sure how much antibiotics are given to Swedish cows, I suppose its similar to other EU countries. Maybe.

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  6. not surprised by the list... it's quite depressing, actually.

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  7. Oh man! I must have injested quite a but of these scary stuff already. :(

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    1. Thats history, but the memory remains:)

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