Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Raggmunk and 5 foods that fight fatigue

Venison casserole etc


Food Diary (April 03, 2012)
Breakfast: Sourdough toast
Lunch: Venison casserole, pork belly, raggmunk, mashed potato, salad
Dinner: Salad
Baking/sweets: Saffron apple cake

I over-ate so much during lunch that I was full pretty much for the rest of the day. The venison casserole and pork belly was really delicious and I took a second helping. The hour and a half walk I took after the meal helped burn some of the calories, but only a small amount. I probably have enough energy to last me a whole week. 

Raggmunk is a strange name for Swedish potato pancake.

Today's Favourite Photo




Today’s Favourite Blog
Source: Care2
This is useful, 5 foods that fight fatigue.

Oatmeal
Carbohydrates spend the least amount of time in the stomach, which means you get a quick boost of energy. But unlike processed, sugary cereals, whole oats don’t result in a sugar crash. The high dietary fiber content in oats helps you feel full longer, preventing overeating throughout the day, which can lead to weight gain, sluggishness, and fatigue. Fiber is also crucial to healthy digestion; the soluble fiber in oats feeds the beneficial bacteria in your digestive tract and prevents energy-draining constipation.

In addition to its high fiber content, oatmeal provides magnesium, protein, and phosphorus, three nutrients that significantly and directly affect energy levels, making it an ideal food for fighting fatigue. It’s also a good source of vitamin B1 (thiamin), which is crucial for producing energy. Symptoms of too little B1 include a lack of energy and loss of appetite. Along with other nutrients, vitamin B1 helps support the breakdown and conversion to energy of the food we eat.

Yogurt
Because it’s soft, your body processes yogurt more quickly than a solid food, making it a great source of quick energy. But while you get a rapid result, it’s also long-lasting, thanks to a good ratio of protein to carbohydrates. Protein stays in the stomach longer than carbohydrates, which translates into a steady source of energy.

Yogurt also contains probiotics, beneficial bacteria that help maintain a healthy gut ecosystem by protecting against pathogens and helping your body eliminate harmful bacteria. Like fiber, probiotics are a powerful digestive aid. Recent research from the University of Toronto suggests that probiotics can help ease symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome; in the study, probiotic supplementation appeared to boost levels of the amino acid tryptophan in the brain. Tryptophan is famously known as the component in turkey that makes you sleepy, but it’s also a precursor of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that helps induce sleep and promote feelings of calm and tranquility, helping to combat both physical and emotional fatigue.

Spinach
Spinach is chock-full of nutrients that are essential for battling fatigue and helping our bodies perform at their peak. It contains iron, magnesium and potassium and is an excellent source of energy-supporting B-vitamins.

Iron plays a direct and important role in fighting fatigue. It’s a known energy booster, helping the body produce energy by delivering oxygen to the cells and enabling them to perform optimally. Without sufficient oxygen, our cells slow down and can even shut down altogether. Low iron levels can cause both physical and mental fatigue, as well as anemia.

Spinach is also an excellent source of vitamin C, which boosts iron absorption. Magnesium is another mineral that plays a vital role in the production of energy. In fact, it’s involved in hundreds of enzymatic reactions throughout the body and directly affects our cardiovascular, digestive, and nervous systems; muscles; kidneys; liver; and brain.

Potassium also helps muscles and nerves function properly. Physical overexertion is a common cause of potassium deficiency, but it can also occur if you become dehydrated due to illness or for any other reason.

Nuts and seeds
Nuts and seeds are nutrient-dense foods packed with high-quality protein and omega-3 fats. Depending on the type you choose, you’ll also get decent amounts of manganese; magnesium; phosphorus; iron; copper; riboflavin; vitamins B1, B2, B5, and B6; and tryptophan — all of which are involved in the production of energy.

Pumpkin seeds, almonds, cashews, and hazelnuts are all good sources of magnesium, which helps fight muscle fatigue. The tryptophan found in sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, cashews, walnuts, and almonds battles emotional fatigue and promotes sleep, which can ease physical weariness. And all nuts and seeds are excellent sources of high-quality protein that our bodies can convert into lasting energy.

Nuts and seeds are also a source of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s are known as essential fats because they’re the only fats our bodies actually require. These healthy fats not only lower the glycemic index of foods but are also a superior energy source. Fats stay in the stomach longer than carbohydrates and proteins; the result is a slow-burning fuel that provides long-lasting energy. Omega-3s help maintain healthy cells and are found naturally in almost all nuts and seeds. Flaxseeds and walnuts are particularly rich in these healthy fats.

Beans
Beans are a concentrated source of stable, slow-burning energy due to their unique nutritional composition: Beans are generally low in fat, high in fiber, and provide a good balance of carbohydrates and protein. They are loaded with a rich array of minerals including potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, and iron, all essential to producing energy. Additionally, super-performing beans — especially soybeans — are a good source of tryptophan.

The protein and high fiber content in beans work together to help balance blood sugar and prevent spikes and dips in energy. The fiber also promotes digestive health, encourages bowel regularity, and helps prevent constipation and weight gain. Thanks to the protein in beans, you get a gradual source of lasting energy.

Beans place a lesser burden on the digestive system than red meat, requiring less energy to be assimilated into the body. In other words, you’re a lot more likely to feel tired and heavy after eating a steak than you are after eating a serving of beans.

The manganese and copper in beans protect the mitochondria in our cells that are responsible for energy production, while magnesium relaxes nerves and muscles and keeps blood circulating smoothly, keeping physical and mental fatigue at bay. Vitamin B1 (thiamin) contributes to energy production, and, along with potassium, supports proper muscle and nerve function. Iron helps produce energy, and boosts oxygen distribution throughout body, easing mental fatigue. Iron provides immune system support as well — and a healthy immune system makes you less susceptible to fatigue in all its forms.

23 comments:

  1. I'm curious to see what the raggmunk is in the photo above. Is it in the picture?

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    1. Yes it is in the picture but its hard to see it clearly. Its the thing between the potato and the venison

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  2. Venison casserole sounds amazing. My friend made me a beef one the other day and we ended up eating about 5 portions between the two of us! Thanks for those fatigue-fighting foods - they will definitely come in handy when I'm studying before a deadline!

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    1. So I didn't do too badly with my two generous portions!

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  3. I think I need to eat a lot of those 5 food items, I am always tired after work

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    1. Yes, all give of them with a large mug of beer, at least!

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  4. It looks like a big lunch, but it's better to have a big lunch than a big dinner! Do you get venison easily in Sweden? Here I can get it at my butcher, but only in season (Autumn).
    Thanks for the useful tips. I might have needed them yesterday, I was running for errands all day and felt exhausted. I might have taken a yogurt instead of a piece of chocolate ;-)

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    1. Thank you, big lunch is definitely better than big dinner.
      I think venison is easily available but I've never bought uncooked venison. Not sure how easy it is to get fresh ones but I see frozen ones in a supermarket and they might be available throughout the year.
      Some deer (a family I have been told) comes into the backyard regularly. When I see them I see venison not deer:) But I suppose they will never appear on my plate!

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    2. You should take up shooting courses! Just in case they get nasty ;-)

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    3. The deer is really gentle and well behaved. They seem happy and have lots of good things to eat. Which means their meat must be delicious:)

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  5. Oh gosh ... I've been missing out on quite a bit, haven't I? Will slowly try to catch up with all your posts.
    Sissi's right, this is a huge lunch. I could never eat so much at lunch but I can for dinner. I know it's not right and not good ... sigh ... I think my body is at a different time zone.
    I'm happy with the list ... they're all my favorite things to eat or to use in cooking and baking (doesn't show much in my blog, does it?).

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    1. Different time zone, and/or just different style. Previously I used to eat light lunch and heavy dinner, that was normal. I've noticed that it is other way around in Europe (if I am not wrong in generalising). Theres a saying "Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper".

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  6. I just love pork belly. I would have had a second helping too. But nuts and seeds??? Am I really going to have to eat those to fight fatique??? Life can be hard! xx

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    1. Yes life can be hard, and exhausting:)

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  7. I always know when I'm iron-deficient because I get so exhausted all the time. That's when I know it's time to up the spinach intake!

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  8. what an interesting article. i do know that when i lack in iron or nuts/seeds, i'm exhausted! but i bet we have to consume copious amounts of spinach...

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    1. Yes, large quantities especially when compared with red meat

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  9. No wonder I'm tired...I need to up my intake of all 5 of these :) Raggmunk doesn't sound as appetizing as potato pancake...thanks for the translation.

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    1. Oat cookies with nuts and seeds and yogurt glaze should do the trick:)

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  10. this post is for me. Fatigue is my middle name these days! Love it

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  11. Your saffron apple cake sounds delish!

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